Article Index

Societal Response to Revised Earthquake Probabilities in the San Francisco Bay Area

Authors
JoAnne DeRouen Darlington, Dennis S. Mileti
Issue
August 1995
Description
Using data collected on the general public, health, safety and welfare agencies and organizations, and businesses in the San Francisco Bay Area we describe what people thought and did in response to receiving an informational newspaper insert about revised probabilities for the next damaging Bay Area earthquake. Our findings suggest that the insert was relatively successful in reaching all groups, that Bay Area residents are making earthquakes a permanent part of local culture, and sufficient knowledge may be in-hand with which to effectively and productively manage public earthquake predictions.

Solidarity during Snow-Disasters

Authors
Wolf R. Dombrowsky
Issue
March 1983
Description
The following article is based on a case study of two snow-disasters affecting the same area within an extremely short interval. Thus, many learn-effects could be studied and many behavior-patterns could be compared. In this context only one behavior-pattern shall be presented. It is a behavior which is commonly said to be \\"jointly responsible\\". The types, modes, causes, and objective backgrounds of such a behavior shall be discussed. The study\\'s results are based on qualitative interviews of 2-3 hours with 40 professionals of the German disaster relief organizations, and on the analysis of documents (official reports, staff diaries, mass media, etc.). A questionnaire is in preparation and should be given to the population which was affected by the disaster.

Some Contributions German Katastrophen-Soziologie Can Make to the Sociology of Disaster

Authors
John K. Schorr
Issue
August 1987
Description
The purpose of this article is to discuss some of the contributions the new and relatively undeveloped Katastrophensoziologie has been able to make to the sociology of disaster. The paper begins by reviewing the German criticism of some of the major figures in the sociology of disaster. The second section of the paper presents some of the possible contributions to be found in recent work within Katastrophensoziologie. Finally, the conclusion of the paper points to the scientific value of an international dialogue between scholars with different perspectives on the problem of disaster in societies.

Sourcing Patterns in News Coverage of the Anthrax Attacks

Authors
Kristen Alley Swain
Issue
March 2007
Description
This content analysis examined attribution of 12 source types in news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks that appeared in 833 stories from 272 U.S. newspapers, Associated Press, National Public Radio, and four U.S. television networks. Sourcing patterns were examined across disaster phases, media types, attribution type, advice type, uncertainty factors, and explanation types. Prominent sourcing shifted from federal politicians to federal health officials after journalists began receiving tainted letters, and first responders emerged as the top source type after the attacks ended. Nearly half of all attributions were unnamed sources. Law enforcement officials were the most commonly quoted sources in stories that mentioned outrage rhetoric, speculation, hoaxes, and false alarms. The findings highlight routines that journalists use in disaster situations fraught with dread and uncertainty, as well as the types of information they seek during different phases of a crisis and by different types of sources.

Special Essay

Authors
Ralph H. Turner
Issue
November 1993
Description
Reflections on the Past and Future of Social Research on Earthquake Warnings

Special Issue

Authors
Michael K. Lindell, Ronald W. Perry
Issue
August 1991
Description
Evacuation Research: Theory and Applications

Special Issue: The Iben Browning Earthquake Prediction

Authors
John. E. Farley
Issue
November 1993
Description
Public, Media, and Institutional Responses to the Iben Browning Earthquake Prediction.

State Emergency Management Agencies’ Hazard Analysis Information on the Internet

Authors
William G. Sanderson, Michael K. Lindell, Seong Nam Hwang
Issue
March 2001
Description
This study examined hazard analysis information on state emergency management agencies’ (SEMAs’) Internet Web sites. The results showed that 3 of the 51 SEMAs’ in the United States did not have Web sites accessible to the public, and another 13 provided no hazard analysis information on their Web sites. Among those that do provide information about hazards, most address relatively few of the hazards to which their states are vulnerable. Moreover, there is a poor correspondence of the hazards agents addressed on SEMA Web sites with either long-term vulnerability determined from hazard maps or recent impacts defined by federal major disaster declarations. This suggests that states are missing a major opportunity to educate local emergency managers and the public about the hazards to which they are vulnerable. Several recommendations are made for improving the content and format of hazard analysis information on SEMAs’ Web sites.

State of the Art In Evacuation Time Estimate Studies for Nuclear Power Plants

Authors
Thomas Urbanik
Issue
November 1994
Description
The purpose of evacuation as a protective action at nuclear power plants is to remove people from areas potentially affected by wind-borne radioactive material. A reason for conducting evacuation time estimate studies is to aid decision makers in the selection of appropriate protective actions. Another reason to conduct evacuation time estimate studies is to identify ways to reduce the evacuation time through the development of appropriate plans.

Strange Bed Partners: Thoughts On The London Bombings Of July 2005 And The Link With The Indian Ocean Tsunami Of December 26th 2004.

Authors
Joseph Scanlon
Issue
August 2005
Description
Strange Bed Partners: Thoughts On The London Bombings Of July 2005 And The Link With The Indian Ocean Tsunami Of December 26th 2004.\r\nAuthor: Joe Scanlon\r\nPages: 149-158